Jihadi dress: A reading list

Dress and identity markers are an important element of jihadi culture, so here is my best shot at a reading list. It supplements my previous lists on imagery, music, dreams, and poetry. Very little has been written about jihadi dress as such, so most of the items on this list are about Islamist dress or Islamic dress more broadly, but I think they provide useful background information. Please ping me on Twitter or send me an email if you know of other good articles or books on this topic.   


Mohamed-Ali
Adraoui, Purist Salafism in France

Hishaam Aidi,
Jihadis in the Hood

Samir Amghar, Le salafisme d’aujourd’hui

Rachel
Charlesworth, Imported Religious Sartorial Markers and the Beard: Perceptions
and Politics in Morocco

Daily Mail, “Inside the ISIS gift Shop”

Mamoun
Fandy, Political Science Without Clothes: The Politics Of Dress Or Contesting
The Spatiality Of The State In Egypt

Fadwa El Guindi,
Veiling Infitah with Muslim Ethic: Egypt’s Contemporary Islamic Movement 

Patrick
Haenni, L’islam de marché

Mervat
Hatem, Gender and Islamism in the 1990s

Maruta
Herding, Inventing the Muslim Cool: Islamic Youth Culture in Western Europe

Rabia
Kamal, Islamic Dress and Fashion in the United States

Reina
Lewis, Fashion, Shame and Pride: Constructing the Modest Fashion Industry in
Three Faiths

Nancy
Lindisfarne-Tapper and Bruce Ingham, Languages of Dress in the Middle East

Annelies
Moors (ed.), Islamic Fashion and Anti-Fashion: New Perspectives from Europe and
North America

Annelies
Moors, “Islamic Fashion” in Europe: Religious conviction, aesthetic
style, and creative consumption

Annelies
Moors, “Islam and Fashion on the Streets of San’a, Yemen”

David
Patel, Concealing to reveal: The informational role of Islamic dress 

Daniela
Pisoiu, Subcultural Theory Applied to Jihadi and Right-Wing Radicalization in
Germany
 

Scott
Sanford, “How to spot a jihadi”

Michael
Semple, Black flags and balaclavas: how jihadists dress for imaginary war

Faegheh Shirazi,
Men’s facial hair in Islam: A matter of interpretation 

Emma Tarlo,
Visibly Muslim: Fashion, Politics, Faith

Emma Tarlo,
Reconsidering stereotypes: Anthropological reflections on the jilbab
controversy

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